Vivo Nex S – CLEAR Edition! – Hidden Camera Exposed


You know how the Vivo Nex S has that hidden
mechanical camera on top? I think we should un-hide that thing and make
it transparent so we can see all the bells and whistles inside…from the outside. This is one of the most unique and futuristic
smartphones that I’ve even taken apart, so it should be a fun one. Let’s get started. [Intro] The psychedelic coloring on the back panel
is pretty stunning. All the different colors reflecting at different
points on the black back. I almost feel guilty about my plans to dissect
and modify the internals…almost. Like with most glass backed phones, the glass
removal is pretty standard. Our heat gun warms the little guy up, and
a strong suction cup and metal pry tool commence the initial penetration…while slicing through
that still warm adhesive. The back glass does have curves around the
edges, so I use a more flexible piece of card stock or a business card to do the slicing,
since a card can wrap around the curve without putting too much pressure on the glass. Glass is glass, and glass does break. For real though, this coloring is super impressive. It’s like someone dropped a bag of Skittles
in a parking lot. I can almost taste the rainbow just by looking
at it. I’ll keep warming up the adhesive before it
cools down and gets hard. Got to keep it right around that perfect temperature
where your fingers feel like they’re melting off. Lucky for us, the adhesive is just around
the edge of the phone, so once all the cutting is done, the whole glass back panel lifts
up and away from the phone in one piece with nothing attached to the underside that we
have to worry about. The trick now through is that the mechanical
camera operation that we want to show off is still hidden under this metal plate. The phone still turns on and the camera functions,
so it’s all still good. Let’s work on removing the color first. We encounter a few different types of materials
covering the underside of glass phones. It could be a thin layer of paint like LG,
or goofy laminate that doesn’t want to come off like HTC uses. Or the third option is a thin layer of laminate
that’s easily peeled off in one giant piece. And lucky for us, that’s what Vivo is using
on this Nex S. A little heat here and there helps out, and the adhesive comes off, leaving
the glass clean and clear with no residue. The camera lens comes off as its own little
metal unit. I’ll install that again later after I get
the color out from underneath it. And it’s clear. Looking closely the Nex logo in the middle
and the Vivo logo down at the bottom are still intact, which is fine with me. And now our bezel-less smartphone has it’s
own clear back glass panel to show off all the high tech goodness inside. The only thing that would make it better right
now is if we could see the mechanical components of the front-facing camera while they are
operating. I think it’s possible. There are 12 screws holding down the metal
plate over the motherboard. Pulling that off gives us our first look at
the camera raising mechanism. It looks like a lead screw stepper motor is
doing all the work. The motor on the right twists the screw which
raises and lowers the camera in and out of the phone. The camera, of course, receives its communication
from the motherboard like normal with one of those Lego connectors, but this time has
a really long flexible ribbon so it can keep moving in and out. The large spring is probably to make sure
nothing gets damaged if the camera gets bumped. It absorbs the bump instead of hurting the
lead screw with the motor. Pretty smart of Vivo to design something like
this. Thumbs up for that. What’s not smart though, is covering up all
that beautiful engineering inside the phone. It deserves to be shown off, and that’s where
I come in. I want to keep the back metal mostly intact
because it might contain little antennas and I also like how it’s aesthetically silver
to match the rest of the phone. The part over the camera and motor isn’t as
important as the rest of it though. A little snippity-snip from my scissors will
take care of that. I’ll leave as many screw holes as possible
so it’s still secure. And then I’ll put all 12 screws back in, including
the ones around the motherboard, so it’s still tight and the motor won’t flex out of place
on accident. I’ll do a full tear down of this phone in
another video. I’ll clean up the remaining adhesive residue
from inside the phone, and then I’ll add my own strong double-sided tape around the edges. This helps keep the glass in place, as well
as dust out of the phone. The Vivo Nex S wasn’t water-resistant to start
with, and is definitely not water-resistant now after this little operation. I’ll get rid of fingerprints on the underside
of that glass since I won’t have access to it when the glass is set in place. The camera goes back in making sure to keep
things fingerprint-free. And we’re ready to drop the back glass in
place and secure it all around the edges with a little bit of pressure. The phone does turn on, and now everything
inside the phone is exposed to the outside viewers while being fully protected with glass. Yeah that psychedelic layer was pretty cool,
but the pure modern industrial mechanical look of this phone is pretty awesome. The bright shiny metallic silver battery is
perfect for this build, and we can clearly see the camera flexing in and out of the phone
continuously. This might be my favorite clear phone yet. Feel free to share this video with other technology
loving individuals. With enough voices, we just might get manufacturers
making clear phones before I get my hands on them. Hit that subscribe button if you haven’t already. And come hang out with me on Twitter and Instagram. Thanks a ton for watching, and I’ll see you
around.

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